Tag Archive: temperature recorders

Visit CAS DataLoggers at Pittcon!

Wireless Data Loggers Automate Data Collection in the Lab

CHESTERLAND OH—March 11, 2015

Right now we’re at Pittcon 2015 in New Orleans! Our Sales Manager Pete Martin and Applications Specialist Tony King are on hand at the world’s largest annual premier conference and exposition for laboratory science. They’re showing attendees how they can streamline their data collection with the new T&D Thermo WiFi series dataloggers. Get a look at our Pittcon offerings at http://www.dataloggerinc.com/content/news/general_news/851/visit_cas_dataloggers_at_pittcon/.

Widespread Vaccine Storage Negligence Comes to National Attention

As Recently Reported on Good Morning America
CHESTERLAND OH—June 6, 2012

Accsense A2-05 Temperature Monitor

Accsense A2-05 Temperature Monitor

A recent segment on Good Morning America featured at http://gma.yahoo.com/doctors-improperly-storing-vaccines-192330733–abc-news-topstories.html presents startling proof of widespread negligence in vaccine storage: “An investigation by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General (HHS OIG) found that many providers of immunizations meant for low-income children don’t store the vaccines at proper temperatures, potentially rendering them ineffective and placing children at risk for contracting serious diseases.” Read more on our Press Releases page.

Training Aid Development For a Fire and Rescue Service

Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Logger
CHESTERLAND OH—December 6, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for a large county’s Fire and Rescue Service (FRS) whose workers were acknowledged national leaders in the field of fire behavior training. Firefighters wearing heavy breathing apparatus and protective clothing often had to work in smoke-filled environments with very low visibility; hearing was limited by the roar of the fire and the noise of the appliances; the senses of smell and taste were blocked by the breathing apparatus; and the sense of touch was hampered by thick gloves. Under such dangerous conditions, extensive training was paramount for protecting firefighters. This training regime relied on starting substantial fires in the confined spaces of specially modified steel road haulage containers in patterns and intensities that replicated realistic conditions and were repeatable so firefighters could practice tackling the same fires over and over again. Accurately logged data also had a vital safety role to play in the training environment–if an officer was injured during training, a high-precision datalogger could help reveal the problem. These dataloggers were also crucial in training firefighters to control potentially lethal blaze conditions such as flashovers and back drafts. However, existing systems for capturing information during exercises were frequently damaged from water and condensation and were prone to giving inaccurate and inconsistent results. Consequently, FRS instructors saw the need for a waterproof and highly durable data logger to provide the county’s firefighters in training with a second-by-second record of how quickly and effectively they brought a blaze under control. Portability and the versatility to measure several different values including temperature and current were also necessities, as well as user-friendly software with graphing capabilities for data analysis.

County firefighters installed a specially modified Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Logger in their sealed training rooms. Within the small spaces, electronics, water, and heat all combined to form dangerous interactions, and there was a lot of water flying around in the training exercises. In view of this hazard, the modified Squirrels were encased in robust waterproof cases with waterproof power links. To combat condensation, the logger was calibrated and sealed in the comfort of an office rather than on the training ground. While designing the logger, CAS technicians looked at the practical problems firefighters could face while using the Squirrel in the field. In addition to developing a completely waterproof case for the datalogger, they developed oversized switches and ports so firefighters wearing large padded gloves could operate the equipment more easily.

The SQ2020 universal data logger offered program instructors a high-quality, highly accurate (0.05%) battery-powered solution able to measure a wide range of physical values including temperature, humidity, current, voltage and resistance; this custom version also measured pressure. Renowned for their ruggedness and durability, the handheld and portable SQ2020 dataloggers featured 24-bit analog-to-digital converters enabling precise measurements. The logger’s built-in display and keypad allowed it to be used either in stand-alone operation or as a PC-linked data acquisition system. The logger featured 8 to 16 universal analog inputs and 8 digital inputs as well as up to 16 derived/calculated channels and 4 pulse rate/counter inputs. 4 alarm outputs notified engineers when engine temperatures went out of specification, and the device also recorded up to 14 million readings utilizing a removable MMC/SD card. The datalogger was easily configured via integral interface or via PC and offered both USB and RS232 connectivity.

Three sensors were fitted in the steel training containers at the average level head height in 3 positions: while standing, kneeling down, and in the crawling position. As a training fire fighter tackled a blaze, the logger plotted the temperature from these three sensors at one-second intervals. The datalogger was then simply plugged into a PC and the data was downloaded. Each sensor’s data was then displayed on one graph so that the firefighter and instructors could analyze performance in the classroom later. For example, to avoid flashovers, the safest technique was to spray the ceiling area in front of the blaze with just enough water to lower the temperature of the atmosphere, but not too much water to push the heat down on to the firefighter. The ideal graph profile in these controlled training conditions would show temperatures at all three heights being reduced at roughly the same rate. If the middle graph (monitoring temperature at kneeling head height) went up while the ceiling temperature graph came down rapidly, this was a clear indication that the firefighter had sprayed too much water at the ceiling and created dangerous levels of hot steam lower down.

A further modification to the SQ2020 measured the pressure of a sealed room during a fire; this was used to help instructors better understand how to recognize and combat lethal backdraft conditions which occurred as fire in a sealed space such as a bedroom became starved of oxygen and began to die down. If a fire fighter opened a door or window into such a space, fresh oxygen was suddenly sucked in and supercharged the fire. Within seconds the blaze would explode out of the newly created opening and could engulf the unwary firefighter. The county’s firefighting instructors plotted the cycle of fires in these sealed spaces in order to better understand how to fight them safely, and the Squirrel logger produced graphs of these events that resembled roller coasters.

The Grant datalogger also included FREE SquirrelView configuration and analysis software, complete with a user-friendly, spreadsheet style interface enabling quick set-up of the data logger for any application, speedy download of data, and direct export to Excel. The optional SquirrelView Plus software featured additional benefits such as graphical data analyses and advanced reporting options.

The county’s Fire & Rescue Service benefitted in several important ways after installing the Grant SQ2020-1F8 datalogger in their firefighting training rooms. The Grant datalogger’s precise measurements on temperature and pressure contributed the necessary data to the program, and the logger was well-protected in its sealed waterproof case. Earlier datalogging systems for capturing information had suffered from water and condensation damage, but after a year of searching for alternatives, the Fire and Rescue Service had solved both problems. The Squirrel logger was easy to modify for a wide range of different measurements, and its ease of use and portability made for convenient, hassle-free operation at an affordable price.

The specially modified Squirrel 2020 series data logger proved so successful under the training program’s hazardous conditions that the county’s Fire and Rescue Service recommended the datalogger to neighboring fire services, as it aided in training firefighters to practice controlling potentially lethal flashover and backdraft blaze conditions. The project’s success was the result of a merging of practical experience controlling fires with the high-tech expertise to accurately monitor every facet of the development of a fire and of a fire fighter’s progress in controlling it. A fire officer conducting training commented: “We have seen great results from our training program and we are now seeing an interest from other counties and services too. Our new Squirrel data logger is tough, easy to use and accurate. We are extremely happy with it.”

Check out the Grant SQ2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Logger product page here.

For further information on the Grant SQ2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Logger, other dataloggers in the highly successful Squirrel series, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Testing Cooling Systems in Diesel Generators

Using Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Loggers

CHESTERLAND OH—November 22, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently delivered the datalogging solution for a large company providing dependable power generation systems to customers. This company needed to monitor the temperatures of cooling systems built for newly designed large diesel engine-driven generators. The program’s goal was to ensure that the engines operated within their safe operating area even under demanding loads and extreme environmental conditions. Engineers began shopping around for a portable data logger with the versatility to measure several different values including temperature and current, capable of standalone operation without a PC, and that included user-friendly software with graphing capabilities for data analysis.

The company installed 3 Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Loggers adjacent to their diesel generators under test. Engineers put together a portable data collection system using the battery-operated SQ2020 logger, including various configurations of thermocouple sensors which were connected to measure the generators’ surface and liquid temperatures. Current sensors were also interfaced with the datalogger to monitor the generators’ AC power output. The thermocouples were used to measure temperatures at various locations in the engine, cooling system and radiator, monitoring inlet and outlet temperatures as well as the ambient temperature. Split core current sensors were provided that could monitor the output of the generator up to 3000 Amps AC to study the effect of load on the system operation.

These universal data loggers offered plant engineers a high-quality, highly accurate (0.05%) battery-powered solution measuring a broad range of physical values including temperature, humidity, current, voltage and resistance. Popular for their ruggedness and reliability, the handheld and lightweight SQ2020s featured 24 bit analog-to-digital converters enabling precise measurements. The Squirrels’ built-in displays and keypads allowed them to be used either in stand-alone operation or as PC-linked data acquisition systems. Each Grant data logger featured 8 to 16 universal analog inputs and 8 digital inputs, as well as up to 16 derived/calculated channels and 4 pulse rate/counter inputs. 4 alarm outputs notified engineers when engine temperatures went out of specification, and each Grant datalogger recorded up to 14 million readings and utilized a removable MMC/SD card. The SQ2020s were easily configured via integral interface or via PC and offered both USB and RS232 connectivity.

The Grant dataloggers also included FREE SquirrelView configuration and analysis software. SquirrelView’s user-friendly, spreadsheet style interface allowed quick set-up of the data logger for any application, speedy download of data and direct export to Excel™. The optional SquirrelView Plus added additional benefits such as graphical data analyses and advanced reporting options.

The company’s engine temperature monitoring process was immediately streamlined in several key ways after installation of the Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 data loggers. Versatile and durable, the Squirrels monitored the engines’ temperature and current data at a high level of precision, and were easy to modify for a wide range of different measurements. Additionally, the Squirrel loggers’ ease of use and portability made for convenient, hassle-free operation at an affordable cost.

The plant’s lead engineer commented, “The Squirrels allow us to easily collect data during operation of the generators to verify performance data and to see the effects of changes to the configuration of the cooling system. The ability to easily graph for multiple inputs is extremely useful.” Since the loggers offered up to 2 million points of internal data storage, stored multiple runs of data, and could operate standalone without a PC, they were a convenient solution in field tests and to troubleshoot problems occurring outside of the factory.

Check out the Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Logger product page here.

For further information on the Grant Squirrel 2020-1F8 Portable Universal Input Data Logger, other dataloggers in the highly successful dataTaker line, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

CAS Introduces Wireless Temperature Monitoring Solution

Accsense A1-08 Wireless Pod Features Cloud Capabilities

CHESTERLAND OH—November 15, 2011

CAS DataLoggers has partnered with high-quality manufacturer Accsense to announce the A1-08 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, a wireless temperature monitoring and alarming system which provides users with cloud-based data storage and reporting for convenient monitoring. This wireless pod can to connect to 6 NTC thermistor inputs, enabling an increase in the number of sensors per pod and significantly reducing user cost per measurement. When connected to an Accsense B1-06 Wireless Gateway (each supporting up to 16 sensor pods), the temperature pod can monitor and log data with the ability to view and remotely access that data in real-time. The A1-08 datalogger pod also offers users online graphing, reporting, and configuration features. The new datalogger has been specially designed for temperature-critical applications in healthcare, health sciences, research and manufacturing, serving as a convenient temperature alarm system complete with email, pager, and phone alert capabilities.

The wireless pod’s internal ambient temperature sensor covers a wide temperature range of -40°C to +70°C (-40°F to 158°F), with a thermistor input temperature range of -40°C to +112°C (-40°F to 233°F). Offering 2 digital inputs, the A1-08 pod can be connected to a broad range of digital sensors to provide effortless and dependable online monitoring. All temperature measurements are made at a highly precise 0.1°C resolution, and the user-set sampling rate can be anywhere from 30 seconds to every 24 hours, with an emergency buffer of 250 samples per sensor. The multi-thermistor pod’s range extends out to 250’ outdoors and 90’ indoors without obstructions, and the device can run on either battery or AC power.

Additionally, the A1-08 wireless datalogger automatically sends its recorded data to Rackspace, the manufacturer’s completely secure cloud server, where it is immediately stored and available using a backed-up online Accsense Account. The online account gives instant access to charts showing all measurement history, with ranges as narrow as 5 minutes or as wide as 90 days, and also offers a customizable interface featuring a dashboard showing the most recent measurements from all sensor pods.

Users can quickly download measurement data for offline analysis and grant password-protected, limited access to other operators. Using a standard web browser, users can sign in to access reports and graphs or modify the system configuration from anywhere an internet connection is available. Configurable alarms constantly monitor incoming data and can immediately send email, pager or phone warnings to multiple designees whenever an alarm goes off.

The wireless pod comes delivered in a package containing an AC adapter, wall mounting and bracket, a standard antenna, 3 AA batteries, and more, providing a simple yet reliable temperature monitoring system.

Check out the Accsense A1-08 Wireless Temperature Data Logger product page here.

For more information on the Accsense A1-08 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, the B1-06 Gateway for use with Accsense pods, additional wireless data logging systems, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com