Tag Archive: temperature monitoring

Emerging Trends in Data Logging—A Look at RFID Technology

Product-Tracking Technology Revolutionizes Data Collection
CHESTERLAND OH—February 11, 2013

smart_labelsEvery day, CAS DataLoggers offers customers our temperature monitoring and alarming solutions for use in a wide range of industries. With this in mind, let’s take a look at Radio Frequency Identification (also known as RFID, smart labels, or smart tags) and its increasing use in temperature monitoring, asset tracking and even biometrics. We’ll analyze this emerging DAQ trend and how it’s already challenging more conventional products over a wide variety of monitoring applications. Read more on our Data Logging Tutorials page.

Temperature Monitoring Seed Corn in Drying Silos

Producing good seed corn takes much more effort than just planting and harvesting. Agricultural producers need to record and view both time and temperature during their product’s drying cycle. If the seed corn hasn’t been dried enough, it can easily mold and be ruined, but if the product is dried too much, expensive energy is wasted. The Applications Specialists at CAS DataLoggers recommended an Accsense Wireless Temperature Monitoring system which included a Wireless Data Logger Gateway and Wireless Temperature Data Logger Pods for temperature monitoring and alarming. Read more on our Food & Agriculture Applications Notes page.

Troubleshooting Thermocouple Wiring

Thermocouple Basics for Your Temperature Monitoring Application
CHESTERLAND OH—June 14, 2012

CAS DataloggersWhen it comes to temperature probes, users have many sensor types to choose from, including thermistors, RTDs and thermocouples. Thermocouples come in many different types and tend to be the most commonly used probe due to their low cost, high durability, and wide temperature range. A thermocouple works by using 2 different metals to create a reaction producing a small voltage which alters depending on the temperature. Read more about troubleshooting thermocouple wiring on our data logging tutorials page.

Tank Temperature Monitoring and Control

Flexible, Affordable Process Control with dataTaker
CHESTERLAND OH—June 4, 2012

Storage tankCAS DataLoggers recently supplied the industrial data logging technology for a large manufacturing plant monitoring the temperature of several water bath tanks used to maintain the temperature of a sample of material undergoing a long-term durability test. Plant management began searching for a single temperature recording system which could connect to RTDs and thermocouples for high accuracy recordings and also perform control functions whenever the tanks’ temperature suddenly went outside specification. Read more on our Applications Note page.

7 Reasons to Install Accsense for Medical Temperature Monitoring

Accsense Wireless and Wired Automated Monitoring Systems
CHESTERLAND OH—May 17, 2012

Accsense A2-05 Temperature Monitor on a Medical Freezer

Accsense A2-05 Temperature Monitor on a Medical Freezer

Pharmacies, hospitals and biorepositories store high-value but extremely temperature-sensitive products such as vaccines and medicine, prompting the need for automated systems to accurately record and/or archive both temperature and humidity. However, the sheer variety of available solutions can make the selection process a lengthy one. To help them choose an ideal device, the applications specialists at CAS DataLoggers present 7 compelling reasons for customers monitoring their medical refrigerators, freezers, and liquid nitrogen tanks to use Accsense wired and wireless monitoring systems. Read more on our Datalogging Tutorials page.

Temperature and Humidity Monitoring During Truck Shipments

Food transportation temperature and humidity loggingCAS DataLoggers recently supplied the datalogging solution for a chocolate manufacturer experiencing problems when complaints came in from customers occasionally receiving spoiled chocolate products. There were three possible phases where this risk could occur– during manufacturing, transportation, or after the retailer received the chocolate. Since both temperature and humidity were critical to chocolate quality, it was necessary to closely monitor both parameters during the entire process. Using their own equipment, the company found that their manufacturing process wasn’t the cause, so their next step was to monitor the product during transportation.

Monitoring the Storage of Semen for Artificial Fertilization

Accsense Wired A2-05 Ethernet Temperature Dataloggers

CHESTERLAND OH—February 14, 2012

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the temperature monitoring system for a farmer breeding cows via artificial insemination methods to guarantee optimum fertility and herd quality while avoiding the cost of keeping or borrowing a stock bull. To ensure high fertility rates, the farmer kept a supply of bull semen stored at the required temperatures and ready for implantation. Read the entire article on our applications note page.

Tank Temperature Monitoring With a Wireless System

T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—November 29, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the wireless temperature monitoring solution for a company storing water tanks which they were temperature monitoring for a supplier. The tanks contained polluted wastewater awaiting treatment and so had to be constantly monitored and maintained at a certain temperature range to keep bacteria from growing. The company began searching for a wireless temperature monitoring device that could perform highly-accurate measurements and automatically download their data to corporate offices in the building as well as to other remote areas.

The storage company installed 8 T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Loggers on their water storage tanks. Along with these, a T&D RTR-500NW Wireless Data Logger Network Base Station was also installed to form a LAN-based network and automatically collect the loggers’ data. Each wireless temperature datalogger monitored the tank temperature in real time using an external temperature sensor with a measuring range of -60°C to 155°C (-76°F to 311°F) and a measurement display resolution of 0.1°C. Readings were clearly visible on LCD display and could be given in both Celcius and Fahrenheit. Each T&D data logger was constructed with a rugged, compact design and had a large-capacity 16,000 point memory. Wireless communication between these units and the base unit ranged out to 150 meters unobstructed (500 feet), and the tanks’ data could be collected remotely via USB, GSM technology, LAN and T&D handheld data collectors. The wireless communication range could easily be extended by simply designating the data loggers as Repeaters to improve communication. Additionally, the loggers’ water-resistant cases protected them from accidents, and the loggers came with options for screw-terminals or wall mounts. Each unit had a battery life of about 10 months with an option to upgrade to a large capacity battery pack enabling about 4 years of operation.

The RTR-500NW base station linked wirelessly to the RTR-502 units and automatically downloaded their recorded temperature data using an 10/100BaseT Ethernet interface, sending the data via network to corporate offices within the building and also to remote areas. The data could be sent to an e-mail address, FTP folder or T&D’s own free WebStorage server where it was then available to view and to share the data via a web browser.

After having deployed the base unit and begun the operation, if the company suddenly wanted to make settings changes or add a new Remote Unit, this was still possible from a distance over the network without having to collect the Base Unit. The wireless base station also monitored for warnings and sent warning reports across a network to specified addresses. The Base Unit could download via wireless communication one RTR-502 Remote Unit at full logging capacity in about two minutes. If a measurement exceeded one of the set upper or lower limits, the RTR-500NW/AW would judge whether or not a warning had occurred. If a warning had occurred, notification was shown by the LED lamp, and an e-mail report would be sent immediately.

The storage company benefitted in several key ways from installing the T&D wireless system to monitor their water storage tanks. The highly-accurate dataloggers provided wireless monitoring of each tank’s temperature, with their water-resistant casings providing reliable and durable operation. The loggers’ range was easily extended whenever that proved necessary, and management was always kept appraised of the tanks’ temperature via automatic data downloads. Additionally, the dataloggers provided several ways to send their data and warning messages online, offering a convenient temperature monitoring solution at a cost-effective price.

Check out a comprehensive overview of all our T&D products here.

For further information on the T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, the T&D RTR-500NW Wireless Data Logger Network Base Station, other T&D data logging products, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Testing Fuel Consumption in a Gold Mine

Using the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—November 28, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for FPC International, a company specializing in a fuel additive widely used in tankers, trucks, and trains all over the world to save on fuel and engine maintenance costs while reducing carbon footprints and emissions. Rather than just making claims of their product’s benefits, FPC Intl. actively tested and documented its results, making all of their testing available online for customer review. The company’s current project was located in a productive gold mine in Sonora, Mexico. The mine’s owners used 60 rock trucks with Caterpillar 789C diesel engines to haul the gold ore out, and FPC arranged a demonstration including a series of fuel tests to show the owners the benefits of switching from the additive they were currently using. FPC engineers therefore had a need for a powerful yet cost-effective datalogging solution with the flexibility needed to measure the engines’ horsepower output and fuel consumption of the rock trucks during brake-specific fuel consumption testing. This intelligent solution would also need to support versatile communications options, particularly USB data transfer for convenient onsite demonstration to the customer.

FPC International installed a dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger in a ruggedized Pelican case in the rock truck under test, inside the cabin right behind the driver’s seat. The logger was powered from the cigarette lighter socket, and the company also installed an inverter which was also plugged into the cabin. The DT80 datalogger was then connected to sensors acquiring the necessary data, including 2 flow meters measuring pulse signals. During the brake-specific fuel consumption test, the flow rate sensors counted pulses and their frequencies from the Cat diesel engine, while RTD sensors were used to measure engine temperature. To measure horsepower, they connected the datalogger to a tachometer measuring the RPM of the motor.

Using these parameters, the test project first measured the efficiency of the truck under test running on its usual fuel, then measured the truck’s efficiency again using FPC’s own fuel additive, and afterward measured the difference between the two. The fuel supply line and return line of the diesel engine were used to find this difference.

The dataTaker DT80 low power data logger was equipped with 5 to 15 universal analog sensor inputs and 12 digital channels. The stand-alone logger performed the test’s measurements at 18-bit resolution and a ±30 V input measurement range, featuring a dual channel concept enabling up to 10 isolated or 15 common referenced analog inputs to be used in many combinations. The datalogger also featured a built-in display and secure connections via removable screw terminals. High-speed counter inputs, phase encoder inputs and a programmable serial sensor channel allowed the DT80 to easily connect to most sensors and data measurement sources. Temperature, voltage, current, 4-20mA loops, resistance, bridges, strain gauges, frequency, digital, serial and calculated measurements could all be scaled, logged and returned in engineering units or within statistical reporting. Operators could also group sampling, logging, alarm and control tasks within schedules to fit their needs.

Data management was equally convenient, with the datalogger storing up to 10 million data points in user defined memory so that the operator could log as much or as little as needed with independent control of schedule size and mode. The DT80 also offered the choice to overwrite or stop logging once the allocated memory was full. Data transfer via the logger’s extensive communications array included Ethernet, RS-232 communication with PC, SDI-12 and Modbus sensor support, and a USB memory slot. After each phase of fuel consumption testing, FPC allowed the mine’s personnel to remove the DT80’s USB so that they could use their own onsite equipment to view the comparative data for themselves, thus preventing any claims that the tests had been biased in any way.

Additionally, dataTaker’s dEX graphical interface was included free of charge with the datalogger. This user-friendly, Windows Explorer-style software came pre-installed and enabled quick setup and configuration of the datalogger. Suitable for both novice and advanced users, dEX was configured and ran directly from a web browser, accessible either locally or remotely over the Internet. Operators could use any of the logger’s built-in communications ports to view dEX, including Ethernet, USB and RS-232.

FPC International benefitted decisively from installing the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger in its fuel consumption test program. The datalogger had the versatility to measure all the necessary parameters needed to prove that the company’s product was in fact more efficient than the mine’s existing additive. Data accessibility was a snap: conducting the tests and delivering the USB data in front of the customer strongly reinforced the test’s results and substantiated the company’s claims to a better product.

Chris Riegel, engineer at FPC International, explained: “It was extremely straightforward to use the dataTaker, and one of the best things we liked about the logger is that it let us quickly get set up onsite and then just let the people there collect all the data themselves using USB. This feature let us avoid any concerns that we, as providers of the fuel additive, were manipulating the data. That really helped us to prove our point that our product outperformed the competition, and in fact we were able to demonstrate a superior effectiveness of nearly 10%.” FPC Intl. is currently using dataTaker products in a subsequent fuel testing project following the success of the demonstration in the mine.

Check out the DT80 Intelligent Data Logger’s product page here.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Data Logger, other data loggers in the dataTaker family, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Heat Control Using a Brainchild Chart Recorder and an Analog Output Card

A High-Tech Alternative to Paper Chart Recorders

CHESTERLAND OH—October 13, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the postsale technical solution for a seafood distributor who ordered a Brainchild VR-06 Paperless Chart Recorder to both record and control the temperature in a large oven. The oven was heated by hot water, and the control came from an iris valve. The aim of this controller was to have a thermocouple reading controlling the analog output. The problem with this setup was that the analog output card only worked in a positive direction, and thus it was difficult to have it open the iris valve as the temperature decreased. To resolve this problem, the following steps were taken in programming the Brainchild chart recorder.

The basic layout of the paperless chart recorder was 1 AI183 analog input card and 1 AO183i analog current (4-20mA) output card. The analog input came from a type K thermocouple, and the target temperature range for the oven was between 200°-243°F (93° and 117°C). The analog control needed to have the iris valve fully open at 200°F and fully closed at 243°F.

The analog output could work with values from any available channel in the Brainchild chart recorder. This included measured analog channels as well as virtual math channels. In order to create a channel that would read in the correct direction for the analog output to work correctly, a math channel needed to be used. Using math channel one, the following statement was used: ABS(A1-243). The constant value was, of course, variable in terms of the temperature range desired. This created a range of 0-43 which was then used in the AO settings as the full range of 4-20mA.

In the AO portion of the software, the output was set for 4-20mA, and the ‘Expression’ portion was made as ‘Math1’. The range was then set for 0.0 to 43.0.

The values given were for the specific project that this solution was programmed for, and therefore could easily be changed to suit other projects.

Check out the Brainchild VR-06 Paperless Chart Recorder product page here. You can also view additional temperature recorders in inventory here.

For further information on the VR-06 Paperless Chart Recorder, the VR-18 Paperless Chart Recorder with up to 18 input channels, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com