Tag Archive: environmental monitoring

Send Data to Your Smartphone with T&D WiFi Data Loggers

Push Your Data to Mobile with T&D Wireless Data Loggers

Push Your Data to Mobile with T&D Wireless Data Loggers

Do you need to log temperature and humidity in a remote monitoring application? CAS DataLoggers provides the TR-7wf WiFi series which records temperature and humidity with simultaneous multi-channel measurement in one device! These data loggers have a convenient Access Point Mode which lets you log directly onto the devices from your smartphone or tablet without a network. These new wireless dataloggers are available now from CAS DataLoggers. Read more on our Product Announcements page.

Environmental Monitoring in a Manufacturing Plant

Accsense VersaLog for Multichannel M onitoring

Accsense VersaLog for Multichannel M onitoring

CAS DataLoggers recently delivered the datalogging solution for a production plant whose process machinery was mysteriously slowing down and causing production delays. This application required a portable datalogger with the versatility to measure temperature and humidity which was capable of standalone operation without a PC. Read more on our Environmental Monitoring Applications Notes page.

Wireless Monitoring and Alarming System for IVF Incubators

 

Automated Medical Monitoring System

Automated Medical Monitoring System

CAS DataLoggers has recently provided the medical monitoring and alarm system for an in vitro fertilization clinic which needed a wireless setup to monitor and alarm several incubators. Staff need to maintain the incubators at a constant temperature of 37oC (99oF) and a relative humidity of 99%. This complex setup required an automatic system to monitor and alarm temperature, humidity and CO2 in real time to alert staff of unsafe levels and  help prevent any losses. Read more on our Environmental Applications Notes page.

Animal Temperature Monitoring for Conservation and Research

Animal Temperature Monitoring Solutions

Animal Temperature Monitoring Solutions

Zoos, shelters, universities and other organizations often need to monitor and record animal temperature for conservation and research. In many of these projects, staff also need temperature alarms for key events like new arrivals, sick animals and other emergencies. At CAS DataLoggers we regularly receive calls from customers working in these applications and help them to find the right data logger. With this in mind, here are three common examples of data collection methods we’ve set up for our customers. Read more on our Life Science Applications Notes page.

Environmental Monitoring in a College Athletic Center

Readouts and Alarms Accessible from a Mobile Device
CHESTERLAND OH—April 3, 2013

Wireless Temp and Humidity Data Logger

Wireless Temp and Humidity Data Logger

CAS Data Loggers
recently provided the environmental datalogger system for a northern state collegiate athletic facility. Administration wanted a temperature and humidity monitoring system for use with the building’s wireless LAN network. Read more on our Environmental Applications Notes page.

Environmental Monitoring in an Emu Farm

Recently CAS DataLoggers provided an environmental monitoring data logger for a emu farm’s animal husbandry project. To prevent health risks to the animals, the owners required accurate temperature profiling data and a single data logging solution to measure temperature, humidity, and many other parameters at precise accuracy. Read more on our Environmental Applications Notes page.

Environmental Monitoring of Algal Blooms in a River System

Stand-Alone Recording with Battery Backup CHESTERLAND OH—May 31, 2012 Algae bloomCAS DataLoggers recently provided the data logging solution for an environmental organization monitoring an outbreak of algal blooms in a major river. The slime-colored blooms had formed as a rapid increase in the population of aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms (such as phytoplankton or cyanobacteria) to the extent that the water became noticeably discolored. First a research team was formed to ascertain all the factors contributing to the outbreak. Researchers hoped that there was a way of allowing the river’s natural forces to inhibit its algae growth, given that the river was also dammed at frequent intervals by a system of locks and weirs. To this end, they required detailed knowledge of weather conditions on the river’s surface and a highly-accurate temperature stratification profile within the river itself. Read more on our Environmental Applications Notes page.