Tag Archive: datataker

CAS DataLoggers Introduces New Environmental Monitoring Solution

dataTaker DT82E Environmental Data Logger
CHESTERLAND OH—April 2, 2012

Workers in environmental applications are always searching for a cost-effective solution to monitor any number of different parameters including water turbidity, air pressure, flow, and much more. Now CAS DataLoggers offers customers the dataTaker DT82E Environmental Data Logger, designed to handle environmental monitoring applications where robust functionality and low power consumption are necessities. The DT82E is a robust, stand-alone, ultra low-power data logger featuring universal inputs, USB memory stick support, 18-bit resolution and a built-in display. Read the entire article on our product announcement page.

High-Powered Engine Testing on a Navy Patrol Boat

CHESTERLAND OH-April 2, 2012

Patrol boatCAS DataLoggers recently provided the data logging solution for a heavy equipment and engine dealer. The company was running a strenuous test program to help a leading manufacturer validate a new engine design by measuring the performance of its engines installed in a navy patrol boat. The customer’s client specified the test procedures to be carried out, and company engineers conducted these tests by operating the boat, capturing all the required data, and then organizing it for later analysis. The program collected various data to test the effects of a wide range of factors including engine speed, boat speed, temperature, differential fuel pressure, and many others. Read the entire article on our applications note page.

Monitoring Plastic Extruders for Temperature and Power

Intelligent Datalogging from dataTaker

CHESTERLAND OH—March 13, 2012

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for a plastic tubing manufacturer who needed to monitor their plastic extruders for both power and temperature to ensure reliable and safe operation. Operators also wanted to track run time and make sure that all critical parts such as motors, drives, and feed screws were continually temperature monitored as the machine formed the molten plastic into the shape of the tubing and didn’t exceed safe parameters. Power consumption was another important factor to watch, especially checking that the motors weren’t drawing too much power. Therefore management began searching for a flexible and intelligent datalogger which could connect to most sensors and data measurement sources to record all the required signal types. Read the entire article on our applications note page.

Monitoring Solar Hot Water Systems

dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger
CHESTERLAND OH—December 19, 2011

An installer of solar hot water systems needed a data logger that could monitor the temperature, water flow rate, and several other parameters at various points in the system, control the different circulating pumps, record the data for performance tracking, and monitor the energy production for billing. This solution needed to have the flexibility to accommodate many different sensor types including thermistors, 4-20mA current loops, voltage from pyranometers, and pulse signals from the flow meters and energy meter. The logger also needed the ability to save historical data to an offsite location and also to capture near real-time data snapshots for periodic monitoring during the day.

A dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger was installed in the solar hot water system as the main controller. 9 thermistor sensors were then connected to the datalogger to provide highly accurate temperature measurements at different points in the system including the solar collectors’ inlet and outlet, the heat exchanger inlet and outlet, and the hot water storage tank. Flow meters with 4-20 mA outputs provided data on the various flow rates within the system including the solar loop, the heat exchanger loop, and the storage tank outlet. The pyranometer provided information on the level of incident sunlight. The DT80’s digital outputs were connected to relays controlling the contactors for the different circulating pumps such as the solar loop pump, the heat exchanger pump, and the rejection pump, which dumped excess energy to a radiator if the incoming solar energy exceeded what could be used or stored. Finally, a counter input was used to capture data from a certified meter that determined how much energy the system produced.

A major part of the project involved designing the logic and control routines for the system. The dataTaker data logger monitored the temperature differential across the solar panel to determine if there was an adequate net temperature gain, and if so, it would direct the system to send hot water to the storage tank and then sent into the rest of the system. If the temperature in the storage tank became too high, the logger would switch on the rejection pump to dump the excess energy back into the atmosphere.

To facilitate data accessibility to remote locations, the FTP capabilities of the datalogger were used to periodically “push” the data to a server located in the installer’s office. The data was uploaded in 2 formats, a full data set for archiving and detailed analysis, and a decimated data set consisting of every 10th data point uploaded at more frequent intervals providing near real-time monitoring. Furthermore, this data was sent in formats which allowed quick parsing out of the various values and presentation through a monitoring website.

The company’s installation has been successful. In particular, the installer liked the DT80’s versatility to capture many different physical values including thermistors, 4-20mA current loops, voltage from pyranometers, and pulse signals from the flow meters and energy meter. The intelligent data logger also provided an number of options for future enhancements including expanding the number of inputs with dataTaker CEM20 modules to handle larger systems; the built in web server to provide real-time updates directly from the logger; and a serial interface to allow direct connection to the energy meter to capture additional data or to an HMI for a local operator or service technician.

Check out the DT80 Intelligent Universal data logger product page here.

For more information on the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal data logger, other dataloggers in the highly successful dataTaker line, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Totalizing with dataTaker DT8x Data Loggers

Utilizing dataTaker Intelligent Universal Input Dataloggers

CHESTERLAND OH—November 30, 2011

Systems integrators often receive requests for help with datalogging applications that require totalizing to get volume, event counts or the total energy produced or consumed. Using the internal channel variables and calculation capabilities of the dataTaker DT8x series of intelligent dataloggers, it is quite easy to capture cumulative totals as well as to total over a particular period of time such as a day, week or month. There are 2 types of signals that can be totalized: analog signals like a 4-20mA current loop from a device like a flow meter, and digital signals from a switch or pulse output meter. The technique to totalize each is slightly different.

When totalizing analog signals, a very common application involves reading a flow meter which provides a 4-20 mA output to display the instantaneous flow rate and then integrating this flow rate to get volume. dataTaker data loggers provide 2 built-in functions to automatically integrate measured values. The IB Data Manipulation function provides a simple 2 point integration by taking the average value calculated from the current sample and the previous sample and dividing by the time difference between the 2 samples. The INT Statistical function will sample the input at a rate determined by the statistical schedule and perform an integration using a trapezoidal approximation.

The main difference between these 2 techniques is how often the input is sampled to perform the integration. The IB function will only sample based on the main schedule rate, whereas the INT function samples at the statistical schedule rate. For example, if the main schedule was set for a 1-minute sample interval and the statistical schedule was set for a 10 second interval, the IB function would sample the input once every minute and integrate using just these 2 points while the INT function would sample every 10 seconds and return the sum of these 6 smaller integrations. While the INT function requires more resources and may not be appropriate for an application that requires low power, the advantage is obvious–it provides much better accuracy for situations where the flow could change rapidly–for example in a process machine that may be switching the flow on and off during different parts of the process cycle.

In either case, the function only provides the total over the sample interval, so it is necessary to use an internal variable to accumulate the total over a longer period of time. Using the += function provides a convenient way to do this. Simply pick a CV to use for the total, select the Assign to channel variable and then CV = CV + value, and you will now have a variable that contains the total value.
It’s also important to keep in mind the scaling with respect to these functions. Both functions work in units of seconds, so it may be necessary to adjust the scaling to get the returned value in the desired units. For example, if the desired units for the flow rate are in gallons per minute (GPM), then the value returned by either of the integration functions must be divided by 60 to convert from seconds to minutes to get the correct units.

In some cases all that is required is to accumulate the total since the start of the program, while other applications may require a daily, weekly or monthly total. In these cases, another schedule within the logger (in conjunction with an alarm if necessary) can be used to reset the total. For example, if only a daily total was required, a second schedule could be created to run once a day and within this schedule the CV containing the accumulated total could be set to 0.

For other reset intervals, the data logger also provides an internal channel for the day of the week (4ST) along with system variables for the day of the month (20SV) and day of the year (21SV). These can be used in an alarm statement to reset the channel variables containing the totalized data via the Action Command. Finally, it is also possible to use a manually triggered schedule to reset the counters. In this instance the schedule (triggered by an external switch or pushbutton) can contain the commands to reset the variables containing the accumulated total to zero.

Totalizing a device with a digital pulse signal output is easier than a sensor with an analog output. The dataTaker datalogger has 2 sets of counter inputs that can be used to count pulses. Any of the digital inputs 1D-8D (1D-4D for DT82 loggers) can be used as a low speed counter to measure pulses up to 25 hZ. Be aware, however, that these counters are not active if the logger is asleep, so they are not suitable for applications that require the lowest power consumption when the logger is allowed to sleep between samples.

If it is necessary to measure higher speed pulses, the loggers also provide 4 high speed counter inputs that can measure pulse frequencies up to 10 kHz. These counters can automatically accumulate the number of pulses, so that with the appropriate scaling they can provide a direct output of totalized flow. However, the counters are 32 bits wide, so it is possible for them to overflow and wrap back to zero. These counters also have a resetting mode whereby they are reset to zero after each time they are read. It is possible to combine the resetting mode with a channel variable that uses the += function to provides an accumulating counter in software. In this case, the counter is read, added to the totalized count that is contained in a variable, and then reset to zero to start the next count interval. Just like the analog counters, the digital counters can be reset by a schedule with an alarm command if necessary to periodically reset the total.

For further information on the dataTaker DT8X series of intelligent universal data loggers, other dataloggers in the highly successful dataTaker line, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Testing Fuel Consumption in a Gold Mine

Using the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—November 28, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for FPC International, a company specializing in a fuel additive widely used in tankers, trucks, and trains all over the world to save on fuel and engine maintenance costs while reducing carbon footprints and emissions. Rather than just making claims of their product’s benefits, FPC Intl. actively tested and documented its results, making all of their testing available online for customer review. The company’s current project was located in a productive gold mine in Sonora, Mexico. The mine’s owners used 60 rock trucks with Caterpillar 789C diesel engines to haul the gold ore out, and FPC arranged a demonstration including a series of fuel tests to show the owners the benefits of switching from the additive they were currently using. FPC engineers therefore had a need for a powerful yet cost-effective datalogging solution with the flexibility needed to measure the engines’ horsepower output and fuel consumption of the rock trucks during brake-specific fuel consumption testing. This intelligent solution would also need to support versatile communications options, particularly USB data transfer for convenient onsite demonstration to the customer.

FPC International installed a dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger in a ruggedized Pelican case in the rock truck under test, inside the cabin right behind the driver’s seat. The logger was powered from the cigarette lighter socket, and the company also installed an inverter which was also plugged into the cabin. The DT80 datalogger was then connected to sensors acquiring the necessary data, including 2 flow meters measuring pulse signals. During the brake-specific fuel consumption test, the flow rate sensors counted pulses and their frequencies from the Cat diesel engine, while RTD sensors were used to measure engine temperature. To measure horsepower, they connected the datalogger to a tachometer measuring the RPM of the motor.

Using these parameters, the test project first measured the efficiency of the truck under test running on its usual fuel, then measured the truck’s efficiency again using FPC’s own fuel additive, and afterward measured the difference between the two. The fuel supply line and return line of the diesel engine were used to find this difference.

The dataTaker DT80 low power data logger was equipped with 5 to 15 universal analog sensor inputs and 12 digital channels. The stand-alone logger performed the test’s measurements at 18-bit resolution and a ±30 V input measurement range, featuring a dual channel concept enabling up to 10 isolated or 15 common referenced analog inputs to be used in many combinations. The datalogger also featured a built-in display and secure connections via removable screw terminals. High-speed counter inputs, phase encoder inputs and a programmable serial sensor channel allowed the DT80 to easily connect to most sensors and data measurement sources. Temperature, voltage, current, 4-20mA loops, resistance, bridges, strain gauges, frequency, digital, serial and calculated measurements could all be scaled, logged and returned in engineering units or within statistical reporting. Operators could also group sampling, logging, alarm and control tasks within schedules to fit their needs.

Data management was equally convenient, with the datalogger storing up to 10 million data points in user defined memory so that the operator could log as much or as little as needed with independent control of schedule size and mode. The DT80 also offered the choice to overwrite or stop logging once the allocated memory was full. Data transfer via the logger’s extensive communications array included Ethernet, RS-232 communication with PC, SDI-12 and Modbus sensor support, and a USB memory slot. After each phase of fuel consumption testing, FPC allowed the mine’s personnel to remove the DT80’s USB so that they could use their own onsite equipment to view the comparative data for themselves, thus preventing any claims that the tests had been biased in any way.

Additionally, dataTaker’s dEX graphical interface was included free of charge with the datalogger. This user-friendly, Windows Explorer-style software came pre-installed and enabled quick setup and configuration of the datalogger. Suitable for both novice and advanced users, dEX was configured and ran directly from a web browser, accessible either locally or remotely over the Internet. Operators could use any of the logger’s built-in communications ports to view dEX, including Ethernet, USB and RS-232.

FPC International benefitted decisively from installing the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger in its fuel consumption test program. The datalogger had the versatility to measure all the necessary parameters needed to prove that the company’s product was in fact more efficient than the mine’s existing additive. Data accessibility was a snap: conducting the tests and delivering the USB data in front of the customer strongly reinforced the test’s results and substantiated the company’s claims to a better product.

Chris Riegel, engineer at FPC International, explained: “It was extremely straightforward to use the dataTaker, and one of the best things we liked about the logger is that it let us quickly get set up onsite and then just let the people there collect all the data themselves using USB. This feature let us avoid any concerns that we, as providers of the fuel additive, were manipulating the data. That really helped us to prove our point that our product outperformed the competition, and in fact we were able to demonstrate a superior effectiveness of nearly 10%.” FPC Intl. is currently using dataTaker products in a subsequent fuel testing project following the success of the demonstration in the mine.

Check out the DT80 Intelligent Data Logger’s product page here.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Data Logger, other data loggers in the dataTaker family, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Applying Thermocouple Calibration Corrections Yourself

Using the Popular DT80 Series of dataTaker Data Loggers

CHESTERLAND OH—November 23, 2011

When working with dataloggers, users sometimes have to apply calibration corrections themselves, which can be quite an involved process. This tutorial examines a scenario involving thirty thermocouples connected to a dataTaker device in the bestselling DT80 series of intelligent universal data loggers which needs to have calibration corrections applied.

The technique is to calculate a polynomial equation to calculate the adjustments, and the
dataTaker datalogger can do this in a number of ways. First, the built-in polynomial function can be used to apply the adjustment. There are fifty spans and polynomials available on the DT80 range of loggers. If more than fifty thermocouples need to be calibrated individually, a different technique must be used; this alternate method involves using channel variables and calculating the adjusted temperature values.

Using polynomial corrections, the first step is to calculate the polynomial factors. For example, these results from the calibration lab are expressed as corrections at measured temperatures. They are in the form shown below:

Test Temp 1 -50.40°C Measured Temp -47.30°C Correction -3.10°C
Test Temp 2 0.04°C Measured Temp -0.70°C Correction 0.74°C
Test Temp 3 200.85°C Measured Temp 202.40°C Correction -1.55°C
Test Temp 4 301.10°C Measured Temp 298.40°C Correction 2.70°C

The normal measurement of a thermocouple type K would be in the form
1TK(“Top Side Temp”). To use a Polynomial correction, first calculate the terms of the
polynomial. To do this, use the ‘Trend Line’ feature of Excel. Enter the values in Excel, then highlight the Table and Click the Chart Wizard ICON. Then select XY Scatter. Click Next, Next, Next, Next. Now click Finish. Right-Click on one of the Graph Points and select ‘Add Trendline’.

Select the Polynomial Box and set the Order to 5. Select the Options Tab and check ‘Display Equation on Chart’. Check ‘Show R value on Chart’. Click OK. When the trend line is produced and the equation is displayed, right-Click on the equation and Select ‘Format Data Label’. Now select the Scientific Format and set the decimal places to around 8. Click OK, then click the equation and select Copy.
This is the polynomial for the correction:
y = -1.49953975E-06×3 + 5.74059250E-04×2 + 9.56585619E-01x – 7.38264343E-01
R2 = 1.00000000E+00

The aim is to get an R value as close to one as possible.
A warning when using polynomials: It is necessary to confirm the polynomial correction within the range of temperatures that are being used, as polynomials can produce unexpected results outside the calibration range. Also note that you can right-click on the graph and zoom out and left-click to zoom in. The values given by the polynomial below –100deg C are incorrect.

Using the built-in Polynomial capability
In dEX, the measurement becomes:

This will save the measured and corrected value.

In the case of needing more than 50 calibration curves, the calculation function in dEX can be used to enter the correction factors for each measurement. In this example, assume that the temperature was measured as TSTempRaw and saved in 1CV. Then Select Add -> Calculation. In the Calculation field, enter the equation as shown in Excel and replace the X with the appropriate CV value i.e.:

y = -1.49953975E-06×3 + 5.74059250E-04×2 + 9.56585619E-01x – 7.38264343E-01
becomes:

This will save the measured value and the corrected value.

If you wish to save ONLY the corrected value, uncheck the “Log and display this value” option in the TSTempRaw measurement.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 series of intelligent universal data loggers, other dataloggers in the highly successful dataTaker line, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Applying Thermocouple Calibration Corrections

Utilizing the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—November 10, 2011

To improve the accuracy of thermocouples, it’s common to have them calibrated by a calibration lab. In this particular scenario, a calibration lab has already provided you with certificate which identifies calibration data at certain temperatures, and you want to apply these calibration connections. All you need are a dataTaker DT80 range data logger, the thermocouples with their calibration certificates, and a PC running Microsoft Excel.

To apply these calibration corrections in the dataTaker data logger, you’ll utilize polynomials, but first you must generate the polynomial. The technique is to calculate a polynomial equation to calculate the adjustments. To calculate the polynomial factors, the results from the calibration lab are expressed as corrections at the measured temperatures. An example of this calibration data is given below:

Open Excel and enter the ‘Test’ and ‘Measured’ values into two columns. Now use the Chart Wizard in Excel to create an XY scatter graph using the data that you just entered. Add a trend line to the graph by right-clicking on one of the graph points and choosing ‘Add Trendline’, or using the Trendline Wizard in the ‘Layout’ tab in Excel 2007 and 2010. For trendline type, choose polynomial and set the order to 5. In Excel 2007 and 2010, make sure you check the ‘Show equation in chart’. In Excel 2003, click on the ‘Options’ tab in the Trendline window and check the ‘Show Equation’ box.

To add the polynomial to your DEX program, go to the thermocouple input in the DEX web interface and click on the ‘Scaling’ tab. Click on ‘Add’ and choose ‘Polynomial’. Enter the coefficients for each of the ‘x’ variables in the K boxes. (Note: The factors are listed in reverse order in the DEX software). Now simply save the program to the datalogger and check your values to make sure that everything is in the correct range.

Check out a detailed product overview page for our dataTaker dataloggers here.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger, other dataloggers in the highly successful dataTaker line, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Knowing the Strength of Curing Concrete

Using the Bestselling dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Datalogger

CHESTERLAND OH—October 17th, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided a local construction company with the datalogging solution for one of their larger contracts. The customer needed to measure and predict the curing progress of freshly-poured concrete to determine when the new structure could be loaded without causing damage to the foundations. A newly-poured concrete structure could not reach full strength for a considerable period of time, but it was critical to determine as closely as possible what that duration was to speed construction along and finish the project on schedule. This complex procedure required a data logging solution capable of not only temperature measurement but also able to sense the localized effects of air temperature and of reinforcing which acted as a heat sink–information which could not be determined by traditional sampling procedures. This device would also have to be protected from the harsh late autumn weather and feature a wide range of communications capabilities to send the data over the Internet as well as locally.

The customer installed a dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger adjacent to the freshly-poured structure. The datalogger was then placed in a portable rugged weatherproof enclosure for safe use onsite. Subsequently the dataTaker device was used to measure the exothermic heat generated by the concrete as it was curing via thermocouple wires connected to the logger and cast into the concrete to sense temperature. The company’s custom software was specifically tailored to suit all data loggers in the dataTaker range and used this temperature data to calculate and display the progressive development of the concrete’s strength and predicted the 28-day strength after a full day of curing.

The dataTaker DT80 robust, low power data logger featured 18 bit resolution and a ±30 V input measurement range with a Dual Channel concept allowing up to 10 isolated or 15 common referenced analog inputs to be used in many combinations. Equipped with 5 to 15 universal analog sensor inputs and 12 digital channels, the stand-alone logger performed data acquisition in real-time, featuring a built-in display and removable screw terminals for secure connections. High-speed counter inputs, phase encoder inputs and a programmable serial sensor channel allowed the DT80 to easily connect to most sensors and data measurement sources so that temperature, voltage, current, 4-20mA loops, resistance, bridges, strain gauges, frequency, digital, serial and calculated measurements could all be scaled, logged and returned in engineering units or within statistical reporting. Engineers could also group sampling, logging, alarm and control tasks within schedules to suit their requirements.

Data management was simple, with the datalogger storing up to 10 million data points in user defined memory so that engineers could log as much or as little as needed with independent control of schedule size and mode, and also overwrite or stop logging once the allocated memory was full. Data transfer via the logger’s extensive communications array included Ethernet, RS-232 communication with PC, SDI-12 and Modbus sensor support, and a USB memory slot. With this versatile device, operators could archive data on alarm event, copy to USB memory or transfer via FTP.

In addition, dataTaker’s dEX user-friendly graphical interface was included free of charge with the datalogger. This intuitive, Windows Explorer-style software came pre-installed and enabled quick setup and configuration of the logger, suitable for both novice and advanced users. The software ran and was configured directly from a web browser, so it could be accessed either locally or remotely over the Internet. Operators could use any of the logger’s built-in communications ports to view dEX, including Ethernet, USB and RS-232.

The construction company benefited in several key ways after installing the dataTaker DT80 datalogger in their construction project. This device measured not only the exothermic heat recordings from the themocouple sensors but also the air temperature and the heat sink effects of reinforcing. Additionally, the provided weatherproof enclosure enabled the datalogger to keep logging in spite of inclement weather and also protected it from dust and other such onsite hazards. Operators found it easy to work with the included dEX software for hassle-free configuration of the logger, and the DT80’s many communications options offered data transfer locally via USB or online through FTP.

Check out the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Datalogger product page here.

Additional temperature monitoring solutions can be found here.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Data Logger, other data loggers in the dataTaker family, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

The World’s Fastest DT80

dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Data Logger Hits The Track

CHESTERLAND OH—August 29, 2011

Recently, a particularly tech-savvy motorcycle racer asked the question, “How fast can a DT80 go?” The answer to date has been nearly 149 MPH and 0-124 MPH in 10 seconds. The customer was racing in the SuperMono European racing class, arguably the least technically restricted form of motorcycle road racing out there. The rules were simple: The vehicle had to have a single-cylinder engine that ran on gas on a bike with two wheels–everything else (other than safety-related features) was open for customization. For a number of years this racer, an engineer by trade, had seen the DT80 utilized in any number of diverse applications and decided to put it to use himself. Up to this point he had been occasionally fine-tuning his bike, but the more he raced, the more he realized that nothing was more important than having well-tuned suspension, consistent traction and ‘feel’, all of which were critical to achieving fast lap times. Tired of using paperwork to schedule maintenance checks, he now wanted a technological solution. He also needed a way to monitor the temperature inside his racing suit to find out what clothing was best, since every time he pulled his protective suit on, he’d experience that ‘instant sauna’ feeling underneath layers of impact-absorbing body armor–on a 60°F day, his torso was suddenly exposed to temperatures in the high 70s with a 90% humidity. Any vented clothing felt fine when he got up to speed and evaporation bottomed out at 50%, but he was still overheated, and as soon as he slowed again, the temperature went right back up.

The racer installed a lightly modified dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger beneath the gas tank of his 640cc SuperMono racing motorcycle. Modifications to the DT80 involved changes to the external sheet metal and serial port, along with internal modifications allowing logged data to be resolved to around 0.1 seconds. Two thermocouples were connected to the DT80 and taped to the inside of his racing suit to measure internal temperature.

Analog and digital channels, high-speed counter inputs, phase encoder inputs and programmable serial sensor channels allowed the DT80 to easily connect to most sensors and data measurement sources. Almost any physical value including temperature, voltage, current, 4-20mA loops, resistance, strain gauges, frequency, and more could all be scaled and logged. The DT80 datalogger provided detailed information including the motorcycle’s speed, temperature and suspension performance using its 5 to 15 universal analog sensor inputs and 12 digital channels. This information allowed fine-tuning of various settings to gain the best possible handling on the track. The universal data logger could store up to 10 million data points in user-defined memory, with independent control of schedule size and mode to log only as long as the current race. For maintenance purposes, the DT80 also archived data on alarm event, copying to USB memory and transferring via FTP if needed.

The DT80 stand-alone, low power data logger featured a built-in display, robust construction, 18-bit resolution, and extensive communications capabilities. Communications features included RS232 with modem support, USB, Ethernet and USB memory stick ports for connection to the DT80 locally, remotely or over the Internet. The web interface allows users to configure the DT80, access logged data and see current measurements as mimics or in a list using a web browser.

Actually getting the data was as easy as leaning into the first turn. After each qualifying session and race, the racer carefully examined the suspension travel and wheel speed data recorded to determine if any adjustment was required. DT80 data loggers were designed with flexibility, accuracy and reliability having priority over speed, yet the amount of data recorded during a short race could total nearly 40,000 individual data points. Additional maintenance data such as distance travelled, temperatures and engine hours was also logged to ensure parts were replaced prior to known failure limits. The racer could also see the relative front to rear suspension travel at various points below. For example, the front suspension was showing insufficient damping causing spikes in the data. Normally the data was reduced to cover individual points on the circuit and compared after each single adjustment had been made.

The racer gained several benefits from installing the DT80 directly onto his racing bike, most important of which was the ability to target problem areas for fine-tuning performance. The DT80 was never designed with this particular application in mind, but the fact is that it worked, gathering information far more reliable than using the traditional seat-of-the-pants method. Additionally, if the racer thought he was having a problem on a particular section or corner of the track, he could simply review the data recorded at that point at look at exactly what was happening, like RPM or wheel speed and see how he was using the bike. This precise equipment helped him to ensure continued performance and plan future improvements in an otherwise wild and chaotic sport.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 data logger, other dataTaker data logging devices, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com