T&D Data Loggers

Cocoa Fermentation Using Wireless Monitoring

Wireless Data Logger w/ Temperature & Humidity External Sensors
CHESTERLAND OH—January 4, 2012

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for a cocoa manufacturer which needed to record temperature and humidity in cocoa fermentation boxes in the tropics. The beans had to be carefully fermented to bring out the best flavors and give chocolate its richness. After farmers gathered the cocoa pods and scooped the cocoa beans out, the cocoa beans were fermented inside wooden boxes or “sweatboxes” for a period of six days. A 220 lb. batch of beans along with their pulp was placed in these boxes, and given the amount of fermentation, the temperature would rise quickly, often climbing to 122°F (48°C). Throughout the process, the beans also needed to be rotated within the sweatboxes. However, if they were rotated too often, the beans would be too oxygenated, overheating and causing dark blotches. If the beans were rotated too infrequently, though, fermentation would be incomplete since beans in the center of the sweatbox got less oxygen than those on the sides. The entire process was extremely painstaking, but without closely-monitored fermentation, the cocoa beans would not result in high-quality chocolate. Therefore the manufacturer required a wireless monitoring solution which could communicate with office computers to ensure that the temperature and humidity inside the sweatboxes did not exceed specifications.

The cocoa manufacturer installed 4 T&D RTR-503 Wireless Temperature and Humidity Data Loggers, along with a T&D RTR-500 Wireless Data Logger USB Base Station, atop the wooden sweatboxes. The external sensor on each RTR-503 datalogger was placed inside each box and began measuring and recording the temperature and humidity levels while the cocoa beans fermented inside. Each wireless unit had a temperature measuring range of 0°C to 55°C (32°F to 131°F) and a humidity measuring range of 10% to 95% RH. The loggers measured in both Celcuis and Fahrenheit and were housed in water-resistant cases, with a clear LCD display and options for screw terminals or wall mounts.

The loggers’ wireless communication ranged up to 150 meters (500 feet), and their data could be collected remotely via USB, GSM technology, LAN and handheld data collectors. Current readings and recorded data from the sweatboxes were downloaded from the RTR-503 data loggers (Remote Units) via wireless communication with the Base Station, and then by connecting them to a PC with a USB cable, the data was easily downloaded to an office computer. By registering another RTR-500 as a Repeater, the wireless range could be expanded even further. Each logger had an 8,000 data set memory and a battery life of about 10 months that could be upgraded to last about 4 years. A Base Unit could download via wireless communication one RTR-503 Remote Unit at full logging capacity in about four minutes.

Additionally, by registering the RTR-500 as a Base Unit, it was possible to download recorded data and current readings from the remote units and send the data by e-mail or FTP to a designated address. The unit was also set up to monitor for warnings and send warning reports via e-mail. Moreover, by sending the recorded data to the online T&D WebStorage Service, the manufacturer carried out monitoring of all current readings and/or warnings as well as shared the data via a PC web browser.

The wireless base station also included software for automated download, real-time monitoring, and email alarm. By setting the Warning Monitoring Function to “ON”, if the set upper or lower limits were suddenly exceeded and that occurrence had been judged by the RTR-500 to qualify as a warning, a Warning Report Mail containing warning details was immediately sent to up to four specified addresses, providing total transparency to the temperature and humidity profiling process.

The cocoa manufacturer realized several benefits to the fermentation process after setting the wireless Temperature and Humidity Data Loggers and the wireless base station to monitor temperature and humidity levels inside the wooden sweatboxes. The T&D wireless system not only monitored the cocoa beans but also sent the data to an office PC and even sent email alarms when temperature or humidity went out of specification. The recorded data also aided in analysis to make improvements such as finding the optimal rotation time. These dataloggers enabled workers to micromanage the painstaking fermentation process, ensuring a superior chocolate with a taste that made all the work worthwhile.

For more information on the T&D RTR-503 Wireless Temperature and Humidity Data Loggers, the T&D RTR-500 Wireless Data Logger USB Base Station, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

CAS Introduces New Low Cost 3-in-1 Datalogger

New Data Logger Measures CO2, Temperature and Humidity
CHESTERLAND OH—January 3, 2012

CAS DataLoggers and trusted manufacturer T&D have partnered once more to announce another industry first: the new TR-76Ui CO2 + Temperature + Humidity Logger. This new recorder is a low-cost 3-in-1 logger ideal for monitoring indoor air quality, with a release date in January. The logger is available in two versions: the TR-76Ui which will have T&D’s standard temperature and humidity specifications, and the TR-76UiH designed for laboratory work with the wide-range temperature and humidity specifications first offered in the TR-77Ui. Suitable applications include managing CO2 concentration, monitoring temperature and humidity in schools and office buildings, for energy-saving measures such as ventilation and air conditioning controls, in research studies on photosynthesis and growth of plants, and uses in estimating ventilation.

The multipurpose TR-76Ui CO2 Recorder is a three-channel data logger which simultaneously measures and records CO2 concentration, temperature and humidity. This flexible new datalogger has a wide CO2 measurement range of up to 5,000 ppm and a logging capacity of 8,000 data sets (one data set consists of readings for all three channels). These dataloggers also feature a warning monitoring function with contact signal output. Making atmospheric pressure settings for the measurement location ensures more stable and accurate CO2 measurements.

Free software is included which allows users to download data recorded by the device to a PC via USB connection, whereby data from all three channels can be simultaneously viewed in one easy-to-read graph or table. Users can also save data as text for use with common spreadsheet software.

The datalogger comes delivered in an all-in-one package that includes the data logger unit, sensors and the included software. CAS offers two types of packages with different temperature/humidity sensors depending on the required measurement range and accuracy needs. Additionally, by using a T&D Data Collector TR-57DCi (sold separately), it is possible to collect recorded data from the TR-76Ui via infrared communication and immediately check the collected data on the spot, offering umatched convenience.

For more information on the T&D TR-76Ui Data Logger for CO2, Temperature and Humidity, other high-quality T&D dataloggers measuring a broad variety of parameters, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Power and Internet Connection Alarms for T&D Data Loggers

Real-Time Alarm Monitoring With T&D Temperature/Humidity Systems

CHESTERLAND OH—December 8, 2011

T&D’s compact, high accuracy dataloggers measure temperature, humidity, and voltage/current and are available in wireless, USB and Ethernet models for industrial manufacturing and processing, environmental, and life science applications. T&D network-enabled devices also offer quality alarming functions for temperatures. However, if you are looking for an alarm based on network connection or power state, you’ll require a small application that T&D provides free on its website.

First follow this link for the program: http://tandd.com/support/download/software/app_nccuw.html.The program does not include an installer, so you will need to unzip it to a folder where you can readily find it. The e-mail settings which you will use in this program will be the same as the e-mail settings which are used for sending alarm e-mails from the T&D RTR data logger itself.

When you initially launch the Network Connection Check Utility, you’re presented with a blank screen with ‘File’, ‘Edit’, ‘Mail’, and ‘View’ across the top. Click on the ‘Mail’ menu and choose ‘Settings’. In here, you will see fields to enter all the e-mail server information that you entered into the RTR base unit for e-mail alarming–please enter this now.

When you’ve gotten all the e-mail server information entered, you can then click on the ‘Recipient List’ tab and fill in all the e-mails of the people whom you want to be informed of the connection loss. After the addresses are added, click ‘Close’ and go back to the main window of the NCCU.

In the main window, you can then click on the ‘Edit’ menu and choose ‘Add’ to begin adding the network addresses of your network-connected RTR base units. Be sure to click the ‘Send E-Mail’ check box while adding the device. The program will check the connectivity of the base units at the speed specified in the ‘Add’ window and will then send out an e-mail to the people on the recipient list if any of the dataloggers are found to be offline.

This program should be added to the ‘Startup’ folder on your PC so that the program will begin monitoring every time the PC reboots. When minimized, the program will minimize to the system tray and will be out of the way of your other programs. The program should also be installed on a PC that is battery backed up, and has a backed-up network connection since, in the event of a power failure, it will not send out e-mails.

Check out the T&D product overview page here.

For further information on the bestselling T&D line of wireless temperature and humidity data loggers, other USB and Ethernet dataloggers from T&D, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Tank Temperature Monitoring With a Wireless System

T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—November 29, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the wireless temperature monitoring solution for a company storing water tanks which they were temperature monitoring for a supplier. The tanks contained polluted wastewater awaiting treatment and so had to be constantly monitored and maintained at a certain temperature range to keep bacteria from growing. The company began searching for a wireless temperature monitoring device that could perform highly-accurate measurements and automatically download their data to corporate offices in the building as well as to other remote areas.

The storage company installed 8 T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Loggers on their water storage tanks. Along with these, a T&D RTR-500NW Wireless Data Logger Network Base Station was also installed to form a LAN-based network and automatically collect the loggers’ data. Each wireless temperature datalogger monitored the tank temperature in real time using an external temperature sensor with a measuring range of -60°C to 155°C (-76°F to 311°F) and a measurement display resolution of 0.1°C. Readings were clearly visible on LCD display and could be given in both Celcius and Fahrenheit. Each T&D data logger was constructed with a rugged, compact design and had a large-capacity 16,000 point memory. Wireless communication between these units and the base unit ranged out to 150 meters unobstructed (500 feet), and the tanks’ data could be collected remotely via USB, GSM technology, LAN and T&D handheld data collectors. The wireless communication range could easily be extended by simply designating the data loggers as Repeaters to improve communication. Additionally, the loggers’ water-resistant cases protected them from accidents, and the loggers came with options for screw-terminals or wall mounts. Each unit had a battery life of about 10 months with an option to upgrade to a large capacity battery pack enabling about 4 years of operation.

The RTR-500NW base station linked wirelessly to the RTR-502 units and automatically downloaded their recorded temperature data using an 10/100BaseT Ethernet interface, sending the data via network to corporate offices within the building and also to remote areas. The data could be sent to an e-mail address, FTP folder or T&D’s own free WebStorage server where it was then available to view and to share the data via a web browser.

After having deployed the base unit and begun the operation, if the company suddenly wanted to make settings changes or add a new Remote Unit, this was still possible from a distance over the network without having to collect the Base Unit. The wireless base station also monitored for warnings and sent warning reports across a network to specified addresses. The Base Unit could download via wireless communication one RTR-502 Remote Unit at full logging capacity in about two minutes. If a measurement exceeded one of the set upper or lower limits, the RTR-500NW/AW would judge whether or not a warning had occurred. If a warning had occurred, notification was shown by the LED lamp, and an e-mail report would be sent immediately.

The storage company benefitted in several key ways from installing the T&D wireless system to monitor their water storage tanks. The highly-accurate dataloggers provided wireless monitoring of each tank’s temperature, with their water-resistant casings providing reliable and durable operation. The loggers’ range was easily extended whenever that proved necessary, and management was always kept appraised of the tanks’ temperature via automatic data downloads. Additionally, the dataloggers provided several ways to send their data and warning messages online, offering a convenient temperature monitoring solution at a cost-effective price.

Check out a comprehensive overview of all our T&D products here.

For further information on the T&D RTR-502 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, the T&D RTR-500NW Wireless Data Logger Network Base Station, other T&D data logging products, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Fumigating Flour Silos Using Real-Time Temperature Monitoring

T&D Real-Time Temperature Monitoring Dataloggers

CHESTERLAND OH—November 7, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the real-time wireless data logging solution for the Bay State Milling Company in Indiantown, Florida, a food processing company serving Central and South Florida producing baking flour in bulk and packaged products. The flour mill’s stringent Integrated Pest Management Program (IPM) ensured that the plant’s superior wholesome products were not contaminated with insects. As part of its IPM program, the mill regularly used a powerful industrial-strength fumigant to fumigate its flour storage silos and processing buildings, which was extremely effective but very temperature sensitive. During deployment, the fumigant needed to be kept at temperatures greater than 85°F (29°C) for a period of twenty-four hours. However, with the plant’s equipment shut off for the fumigation process, the flour silos and processing buildings cooled down rapidly and the temperature fluctuated as a result of ambient weather conditions. To combat the loss of heat, the mill was able to add supplemental heat from unit heaters. In order to control internal temperatures, the mill had to have contracted personnel suited in protective gear enter the buildings to manually read the interior temperatures and adjust the unit heaters. Therefore, an efficient real time extended temperature monitoring solution for the flour bins and interior building spaces was needed. Keeping this requirement in mind, the mill began searching for a wireless temperature monitoring solution that would allow personnel to view readings in real-time from outside the buildings. What made this application especially difficult was the reinforced concrete construction of the five story flour silos and processing building.

Bay State Milling Company installed 6 T&D RTR-501 Wireless Temperature Data Loggers enclosed in canvas bags inside each flour silo; the bags were then lowered by rope about halfway down into the 50 ft. deep bins. 2 T&D RTR-500 Wireless Data Logger Network Base Stations were used for a higher frequency so they could daisy-chain with the loggers, acting as Repeaters to extend their range. The data was collected far outside of the concrete silos and processing buildings using a T&D RTR-500DC Wireless Data Logger Handheld Data Collector which accompanied an engineer on his rounds to check the loggers’ real-time readings.

Each RTR-501 wireless datalogger measured and recorded their bin’s temperature using an internal temperature sensor providing optimum waterproof and dustproof protection with a measuring range of -40°F to 176°F (-40°C to 80°C) and an average accuracy of ± 0.5°C. Featuring an LCD display and a water resistant case, the data loggers measured in both Celcius and Fahrenheit at a measurement display resolution of 0.1°C onto a large-capacity 16,000 point memory. Additionally, the loggers came with options for screw terminals or wall mounts and had a wireless communication range of up to 500 feet (150 meters). Utilizing a low-energy consumption design, each logger included a lithium battery with a life of about 10 months and which could be upgraded to last about 4 years of operation.

The temperature data could be accessed in several different ways: via USB, GSM technology, via LAN or the handheld data collector, which proved to be the most convenient method. The wireless base units could download one RTR-501 remote unit at full logging capacity (16,000 readings) in about two minutes, or act as Repeaters. Even from outside the reinforced concrete silo walls and processing buildings, the handheld data collector was able to pick up the loggers’ real-time data from about 200 ft. away, all the way across the mill’s parking lot. Software was included with the base stations for automated download and real-time monitoring as well as email alarm.

By registering the RTR-500 as a base unit, operators downloaded recorded data and current readings from the remote units at a set interval and sent the data via e-mail to specified addresses or by FTP to a server such as T&D’s WebStorage Service, carrying out monitoring of current readings and/or warnings as well as sharing the data via a PC web browser. Up to 20 groups of remote units could be registered to a single base unit, providing easy and efficient management. If the set upper or lower limits were exceeded, a warning report email containing vital details could be sent to up to four specified addresses.

The 500DC portable data collector monitored, managed, started and stopped recording, graphing all the data from the remote units for immediate on-the-spot checking of the building’s temperature data without the need for a computer. The collector wirelessly gathered the data at set intervals to monitor current readings and status from each of the remote units inside the silos without anyone having to go in and manually gather them, saving a great deal of time and removing the safety risk presented by the still-active fumigant. The collector was able to simultaneously manage a large number of remote units, storing up to 15 units of data from the RTR-501 dataloggers on its easy-to-read LCD display. If necessary, the remote units could also be grouped to register even more, with a maximum number of 7 groups of 32 remote units each. The RTR-500DC also eliminated the need for any troublesome preparation such as having to create a network environment or to carry out wiring. The collector’s LCD backlit display let the engineer easily read the data even in the dark. The simple dial made operation easy, with a quick menu structure enabling intuitive operation onsite.

Bay State Milling Company benefited in several key ways following the installation of the T&D wireless real-time monitoring system. Most importantly, personnel were able to check the temperatures in the flour silos and the interior spaces within the process buildings with the handheld data collector instead of having to rely on manual means. Together these sophisticated devices formed a practical and cost-effective solution for the mill’s temperature monitoring application, and the dataloggers’ compact and lightweight design meant they could fit easily in the bags or be placed just about anywhere in the plant. The remote data allowed mill personnel to efficiently manage the efficacy of the fumigant’s deployment.

Bay State Milling Company’s Plant Manager, Mr. Bill Raiola, commented on the convenience of the T&D wireless system: “We were all very pleased to have the real-time data, especially considering where the devices were located inside the flour silos. Our engineer was even able to collect the temperature readings from as far as 200 feet away from the silos and buildings.”

Check out additional T&D dataloggers here.

For further information on the T&D RTR-501 Wireless Temperature Data Loggers and RTR-500 Wireless Base Stations, the RTR-500DC Wireless Handheld Data Collector, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com