Temperature Data Loggers

Monitoring Flower Storage Temperature Remotely

Accsense Wireless Temperature Monitoring System

CHESTERLAND OH—September 27, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the remote temperature monitoring solution for a fresh flower supplier who needed to monitor three remote storage sheds for temperature. Like everyone in the floral supply business, she was always expected to deliver reliably, and a single failure to keep the fresh-cut flowers cool enough could mean a missed shipment and a major loss of reputation. After harvesting, the fresh flowers needed to be kept at temperatures close to freezing, yet could not be allowed to freeze or they would be visibly damaged. Her product was extremely temperature-sensitive, so when her inventory went out of specification, it not only ruined valuable product, but also disrupted the supply chain flow, causing further shipping delays. Continuous temperature recording could help significantly in preventing losses, but the sheds were constructed of metal and located far apart, so the customer had to note that metal did not absorb radio signals but instead reflected them. With this limitation in mind, the customer needed a cost-effective wireless monitoring system that could work within the metal buildings and send all the temperature data online for easy storage and analysis.

The customer installed four Accsense A1-13 Wireless Temperature Data Loggers in each of her three storage sheds, placing them in the packing rooms and in the main coolers. Each sensor pod monitored the shed using an ambient temperature sensor capable of detecting a wide temperature range of -40°C (-40°F) to +70°C (158°F). The A1-13 pods were specifically designed to connect to three RTD 100 Ohm sensor inputs, allowing an increase in the amount of sensors per pod and reducing the cost per measurement. This model also featured two digital inputs and could easily be connected to a wide range of digital sensors. The wireless data loggers were then activated up to their 90′ indoor ranges, operating on either battery or AC power. An Accsense B1-06 Wireless Data Logger Gateway with built-in 10/100BaseT Ethernet was then installed per each wireless group of pods in each of the three sheds to make the online data easily accessible. Diagnostic LEDs gave clear indication of power, wireless status, and more. Each wireless gateway could support up to 16 sensor pods and matched the pods’ 90’ indoor range (250’ outdoor).

The B1-06 gateway sent all of the data to either the Rackspace secure servers or as a local ASCII stream, either of which the supplier could incorporate into her own custom software, including LabView. For example, the supplier’s custom-made Accsense graphs showed her a high-temperature alarm period. The secure servers could also send out voice, text or email alerts (with premium subscription) to inform the supplier and authorized staff when a temperature reading fell out of range. Additionally, data sent online could be downloaded as a CSV file and loaded into most database applications.

Due to the metal sheds, wireless signal transmission among them posed a potential problem, which was addressed building-by-building; the signals often simply reflected until they escaped the shed through a door seal or other discontinuity in the metal. However, the ability of the Accsense monitoring system to “mesh,” where all the dataloggers also acted as repeaters, greatly improved signal reception and transmission. To deal with the long distance from one building to the next, a directional antenna was connected directly to the B1 gateway. These commonly available antennas, used in pairs, greatly increased the range of the wireless signals, easily achieving distances of over half a mile.

The floral supplier realized several advantages from installing the Accsense wireless temperature system in her fresh-cut flower storage sheds. Her new wireless system was cost- and time-effective compared to manually recording the temperature, since automated monitoring was far less expensive and much more reliable while also being documented for future reference. The supplier could also set the system’s warning limits for a narrower temperature range if required. A typical setting for the customer’s cut flowers was every 10 minutes, with the trigger filter set to require 3 data points in a consecutive order to be out of preset limits before the alarm was triggered. If desired, the alarms generated by the system could be sent to customized phone or email lists. The Accsense system’s many programmable features also increased overall versatility in alarm settings. For example, the wireless system could check for alarms at different intervals than those used to record the data.

Check out the CAS selection of wireless data loggers here.

For further information on the Accsense A1-13 Wireless Temperature Dataloggers and the B1-06 Wireless Data Logger Gateway, other wireless data logging devices, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

The World’s Fastest DT80

dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Data Logger Hits The Track

CHESTERLAND OH—August 29, 2011

Recently, a particularly tech-savvy motorcycle racer asked the question, “How fast can a DT80 go?” The answer to date has been nearly 149 MPH and 0-124 MPH in 10 seconds. The customer was racing in the SuperMono European racing class, arguably the least technically restricted form of motorcycle road racing out there. The rules were simple: The vehicle had to have a single-cylinder engine that ran on gas on a bike with two wheels–everything else (other than safety-related features) was open for customization. For a number of years this racer, an engineer by trade, had seen the DT80 utilized in any number of diverse applications and decided to put it to use himself. Up to this point he had been occasionally fine-tuning his bike, but the more he raced, the more he realized that nothing was more important than having well-tuned suspension, consistent traction and ‘feel’, all of which were critical to achieving fast lap times. Tired of using paperwork to schedule maintenance checks, he now wanted a technological solution. He also needed a way to monitor the temperature inside his racing suit to find out what clothing was best, since every time he pulled his protective suit on, he’d experience that ‘instant sauna’ feeling underneath layers of impact-absorbing body armor–on a 60°F day, his torso was suddenly exposed to temperatures in the high 70s with a 90% humidity. Any vented clothing felt fine when he got up to speed and evaporation bottomed out at 50%, but he was still overheated, and as soon as he slowed again, the temperature went right back up.

The racer installed a lightly modified dataTaker DT80 Intelligent Universal Data Logger beneath the gas tank of his 640cc SuperMono racing motorcycle. Modifications to the DT80 involved changes to the external sheet metal and serial port, along with internal modifications allowing logged data to be resolved to around 0.1 seconds. Two thermocouples were connected to the DT80 and taped to the inside of his racing suit to measure internal temperature.

Analog and digital channels, high-speed counter inputs, phase encoder inputs and programmable serial sensor channels allowed the DT80 to easily connect to most sensors and data measurement sources. Almost any physical value including temperature, voltage, current, 4-20mA loops, resistance, strain gauges, frequency, and more could all be scaled and logged. The DT80 datalogger provided detailed information including the motorcycle’s speed, temperature and suspension performance using its 5 to 15 universal analog sensor inputs and 12 digital channels. This information allowed fine-tuning of various settings to gain the best possible handling on the track. The universal data logger could store up to 10 million data points in user-defined memory, with independent control of schedule size and mode to log only as long as the current race. For maintenance purposes, the DT80 also archived data on alarm event, copying to USB memory and transferring via FTP if needed.

The DT80 stand-alone, low power data logger featured a built-in display, robust construction, 18-bit resolution, and extensive communications capabilities. Communications features included RS232 with modem support, USB, Ethernet and USB memory stick ports for connection to the DT80 locally, remotely or over the Internet. The web interface allows users to configure the DT80, access logged data and see current measurements as mimics or in a list using a web browser.

Actually getting the data was as easy as leaning into the first turn. After each qualifying session and race, the racer carefully examined the suspension travel and wheel speed data recorded to determine if any adjustment was required. DT80 data loggers were designed with flexibility, accuracy and reliability having priority over speed, yet the amount of data recorded during a short race could total nearly 40,000 individual data points. Additional maintenance data such as distance travelled, temperatures and engine hours was also logged to ensure parts were replaced prior to known failure limits. The racer could also see the relative front to rear suspension travel at various points below. For example, the front suspension was showing insufficient damping causing spikes in the data. Normally the data was reduced to cover individual points on the circuit and compared after each single adjustment had been made.

The racer gained several benefits from installing the DT80 directly onto his racing bike, most important of which was the ability to target problem areas for fine-tuning performance. The DT80 was never designed with this particular application in mind, but the fact is that it worked, gathering information far more reliable than using the traditional seat-of-the-pants method. Additionally, if the racer thought he was having a problem on a particular section or corner of the track, he could simply review the data recorded at that point at look at exactly what was happening, like RPM or wheel speed and see how he was using the bike. This precise equipment helped him to ensure continued performance and plan future improvements in an otherwise wild and chaotic sport.

For further information on the dataTaker DT80 data logger, other dataTaker data logging devices, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Remote Monitoring of Medical Incubators for Temperature and CO2 Level

Accsense Remote Monitoring System

CHESTERLAND OH—August 29, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the data logging solution for a hospital storing valuable life science samples in medical incubators. These incubators needed to hold samples under precisely controlled conditions for long periods of time–if a problem occurred while the samples were under incubation, the samples would be lost along with the time the materials were being incubated. The hospital’s incubators were typically operated at a constant 37oC (99oF) and a 5% CO2 level. Often, regulators required recording of incubator conditions since any deviations from these levels could cause serious problems. Therefore the hospital needed a remote datalogging solution to monitor its incubators and alert personnel if conditions inside the incubator suddenly went out of range.

The hospital installed an Accsense A1-01a Wireless Environmental Data Logger on top of its incubators, connected to an Accsense B1-06 Wireless Data Logger Gateway supporting up to 16 A1-01a sensor pods. A single A1-01a pod monitored temperature and CO2 levels for two incubators, providing simple and reliable online monitoring. The data logger ranges extended up to 250’ outdoors, 90’ indoors without obstructions, and could also act as a repeater for other logger signals, running on battery or AC power.

Three different monitoring methods could be used with incubators, including direct monitoring independent of the incubator itself. Monitoring the analog outputs of the incubator by using the incubator sensors could also be performed, as well as monitoring of the alarm state of the incubator via the incubator sensors. In the first case, independent temperature and CO2 sensors would have to be installed within the incubator work space. In the second and third cases, the incubator would have to be equipped with the appropriate outputs (often an option card from the incubator manufacturer) and a cable from the incubator to the sensor pod would have to be used. The hospital’s incubators were monitored using the first method described above using direct sensors, which were ordered alphabetically; changing their names allowed a consistent order to the readings.

Designed for general environmental measurements, the wireless A1-01a datalogger pods featured internal temperature, humidity, light and vibration sensors measuring every incubation parameter, as well as external 4-20mA and 0-5V inputs and 2 digital inputs. Screw terminal connectors allowed connection to a wide range of external analog sensors, and the data loggers also included a +5Vdc output to power external sensors. In the event the gateway couldn’t be reached, individual pods stored up to 255 data points until a connection was restored. The B1-06 wireless gateway formed the connection between the hospital’s data and the internet, featuring built-in 10/100BaseT Ethernet and supported DHCP and static IP addressing as well as SSL Encryption for secure communication. Diagnostic LEDs provided clear status indication while the gateway’s 1900-point sample data buffer further ensured constant and effective monitoring.

Additionally, the Accsense wireless temperature monitoring and alarming system provided the hospital with cloud-based data storage and reporting for hassle-free monitoring. Once connected to the B1-06 Wireless Gateway, the pods monitored and logged data with the ability to view and remotely access data in real-time. The B1-06 Wireless Gateway could send all the data to the secure Rackspace cloud server or as a local ASCII stream, which staff could incorporate into their own custom software including LabView. Data online could easily be downloaded as a CSV file and loaded into most database applications. Hospital staff downloaded measurement data for offline analysis, signed in to access reports and graphs, and could modify the system configuration from anywhere an internet connection was available. Sophisticated alarms monitored incoming data and could send email, pager or phone warnings to multiple designees whenever an alarm went off. The sensor filters were powerful enough that when the CO2 content dropped to near-zero during a loading operation, the alarm was not triggered due to correct filter settings. An Accsense online account gave instant access to charts showing all measurement history with ranges as narrow as 5 minutes or as wide as 90 days, and also offered a customizable interface featuring a dashboard showing the most recent measurements from all sensor pods.

The hospital benefited immediately from installing the Accsense wireless monitoring system in its medical incubators. The data loggers were used as a convenient temperature alarm system with email, pager or phone alert capabilities. Using the wireless data loggers made it possible to check the incubators before the samples had been destroyed, saving the cost of the time running the test and saving the samples in the incubator. The remote monitoring system saved significant time and money while increasing confidence in all the incubation test results. Once the readings were taken, a monitor was used to display CO2 level data by percentage for an incubator, as well as link quality, supply voltage, temperature, ambient temperature, and probe temperature. Multiple incubators were monitored from a single screen, along with freezers, refrigerators and cryogenic freezers. Further, the Accsense system’s cloud capabilities put the hospital’s incubation data online to offer management easy data accessibility and analysis. This, combined with the data loggers’ high accuracy, made for an effective continual monitoring solution. Check out the Accsense product overview page here.

For further information on the Accsense A1-01a Wireless Environmental Data Logger, the B1-06 Wireless Data Logger Gateway, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

CAS Announces Wireless Temperature Monitoring Solution

Accsense A1-08 Wireless Pod Featuring Cloud Capabilities

CHESTERLAND OH—August 16, 2011

CAS DataLoggers has teamed up with Accsense to offer the A1-08 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, a wireless temperature monitoring and alarming system providing cloud-based data storage and reporting for hassle-free monitoring for critical applications in healthcare, health sciences, research and manufacturing. The Accense pod is specifically designed to connect to 6 NTC thermistor inputs, enabling an increase in the number of sensors per pod and reducing user cost per measurement. When connected to an Accsense B1-06 Wireless Gateway (supporting up to 16 sensor pods), the pod can monitor and log data with the ability to view and remotely access data in real-time. The A1-08 data logger pod also features online graphing, reporting, and configuration features, and can be used as a convenient temperature alarm system with email, pager or phone alert capabilities.

The A1-08 pod’s internal ambient temperature sensor measures a temperature range of -40°C to +70°C (-40°F to 158°F), with a thermistor input temperature range of -40°C to +112°C (-40°F to 233°F). The Accsense pod features 2 digital inputs and can be connected to a wide range of digital sensors for simple and reliable online monitoring. Temperature measurements are made at a precise 0.1°C resolution, and sampling rate is user-set anywhere from 30 seconds to every 24 hrs, with an emergency buffer of 250 samples per sensor. The multi-thermistor pod’s range extends up to 250’ outdoors, 90’ indoors without obstructions, and the device can also run on battery or AC power.

Additionally, the A1-08 data logger will automatically send recorded data to a completely secure Rackspace™ cloud server for storage, where it is immediately available using a backed-up online Accsense Account. Users can download measurement data for offline analysis and choose to allow password-protected, limited access to other users. Using a standard web browser, users can sign in to access reports and graphs or modify the system configuration from anywhere an internet connection is available. Sophisticated alarms monitor incoming data and can send email, pager or phone warnings to multiple designees whenever an alarm goes off. The online account gives instant access to charts showing all measurement history, with ranges as narrow as 5 minutes or as wide as 90 days, and also offers a customizable interface featuring a dashboard showing the most recent measurements from all sensor pods.

The wireless pod is delivered in a package containing the pod, an AC adapter, wall mounting and bracket, standard antenna, 3 AA batteries, and more, providing a simple yet reliable temperature monitoring solution. Check out the A1-08 Wireless Temperature Data Logger product page here.

For further information on the Accsense A1-08 Wireless Temperature Data Logger, the B1-06 Gateway for use with Accsense pods, additional wireless data logging solutions, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Monitoring Infant Skin Temperatures for Research

Grant SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—August 8, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided a data logging solution for Stanford University’s Department of Pediatrics, Neonatology Division, initiating a research project to acquire data on infant skin temperatures for continuous patient monitoring. Surface temperature sensors connected to portable data loggers were recognized as the most effective means for measuring and recording all of the minute changes in temperature. These changes occurred over both short and very long time periods at locations on the body which were often difficult to measure. A normal body temperature for a healthy baby was considered as being between 97° and 100.4° Fahrenheit (36° to 38° degrees Celsius). Anything above this range could indicate a fever, serious infection, or disease, so the researchers needed extremely accurate skin temperature sensors. After looking as several different options, thermistors, which provide a larger change in output signal for a given temperature change than other sensor types, were the mandated choice for the project. Temperature readings would need to be constantly monitored on a portable, compact device capable of being programmed with customizable alarm thresholds and offering convenient data management…all while staying within the departmental budget.

The university’s Neonatology Division installed a Grant SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger within an incubator, connected to 4 Measurement Specialties Model 427 Medical Reusable Skin Surface Probes for Infants from Fisher Scientific. The data logger coupled with these thermistor probes provided 0.1° C temperature resolution for extreme accuracy along with a fast response time. The FDA-approved probes had highly sensitive, Teflon insulated pressed disk ceramic sensors for measurement of temperature and featured standard ¼” phone output connectors for easy installation. Stanford provided the probes to CAS beforehand for assembly with CAS custom-designed adapters to connect to the Squirrel data logger for a turn-key set-up.

The Squirrel data logger needed to be configured to read the probes, and CAS provided Stanford staff with technical support to get the system set-up. Using the SquirrelView software included with the kit, users configured the measurement channels and established alarm limits through the Setup window. A wide variety of sensor types were supported, and in this case, the type Y thermistor provided very accurate scaling for the Measurement Specialties sensor being used. After installation and configuration were complete, the biosafe surface temperature sensors were attached to an infant’s skin with the aid of medical tape for a maximum of 36 hours. The thermistors located in the sensors provide a resistance output that was proportional to the sensor temperature being measured by the data logger and converted to skin temperature, displayed in real-time on the data logger’s LCD screen and recorded in the internal memory of the logger for future analysis. With the appropriate equipment, the university would be able to perform the yearly recalibration themselves, or use a local calibration company.

The skin temperature probes worked very well with the Grant data logger, its portability being an asset in the limited space of the research lab. The Squirrel 2010 served as a flexible handheld data logger with up to 8 analog input channels capable of measuring current, voltage, and resistance in addition to temperature with 0.1% accuracy. In addition 8 digital channels along with 2 alarm/relay outputs provided the necessary alarm features for the project. The SQ2010 is capable of storing up to 1.8 million readings in onboard memory and features USB connectivity to a PC as well as optional Ethernet or RS232 connections.

The data logger kit also included SquirrelView Plus software designed with a user-friendly, Windows Explorer style interface allowing quick setup of the data logger, quick data downloads and direct export to Excel in real-time or as a .CSV file for customizable data analysis. Flexible data presentation allowed users to get a statistical summary of the data and then quickly display and analyze real time or historical data as a line graph, bar chart or analog gauge. Data could be downloaded by date, time or events, saving time when searching for readings from a specific period. A simple communication wizard enabled hassle-free working with Ethernet, modems, or cellular devices. SquirrelView Plus also added powerful features including graphical data analyses and advanced reporting options. Alarm capabilities included graphical alarm and event identification to set high and low alarm thresholds, letting researchers easily identify occurrences around specific events. Settings could be saved to PC for efficient reuse. Additionally, custom report template creation and customizable report facilities allowed staff to print convenient graphs and readings.

Stanford University benefitted immediately from installing the Grant SQ2010 data logger in the Pediatric Division’s medical research facility, which monitored and recorded all the data from the highly-accurate skin temperature probes. One compact data logger collected and presented all the data in organized, convenient format, as well as offering the mandatory alarm capabilities for the scientists to conduct their research using infants. SquirrelView Plus software was included free and provided an easy-to-use interface along with analysis and customized reporting capabilities. Additionally, the Squirrel data logger’s affordability made it ideal for the department budget while installing easily into the small research room. Check out the SQ2010’s product page here.

For further information on the SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger Kit, other Grant Instruments data logging products, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Monitoring the Temperature of Cryogenic Freezers

Hospital facilities face potential concerns when relying on cryogenic freezers to store high-valued samples which include blood and medical specimens worth considerable amounts of dollars and time spent during critical research. CAS DataLoggers experience and knowledge was elected to assist in determining the most effective and efficient solution to prevent devastating catastrophes through data temperature monitoring. Learn more …

CAS Announces Improved Temperature Monitoring & Alarming Pod

Medical storage applications depend heavily on monitoring the temperature of the goods in cold storage to protect not only the items themselves, but often human lives as well. CAS DataLoggers is partnered with bestselling manufacturer Accsense to introduce the A2-05 Ethernet Wired Temperature Measurement Pod designed for measuring temperatures in medical refrigerators, freezers, incubators, and in cryogenic storage. Read more…

Chocolate Processing at Kinnerton Confectionary

Kinnerton Confectionary in Fakenham, Norfolk (UK), with production lines producing millions of Easter eggs, chocolate lollipops, truffles, and chocolate cartoon characters for its own label and other household brands. Critical to all their chocolate products was the cooling process operating in the ‘cooling tunnel’, inside of which a delicate balance was maintained between the temperature, relative humidity (RH) and the airflow. To give their chocolate the right gloss and a maximum shelf life, CAS DataLogger had to determine the monitoring system that would ensure the cooling profile for each product was maintained. This often proved difficult when technicians had to account for the ambient outside temperature and relative humidity, both of which could change several times during the day from April to the end of September as the local weather fluctuated violently. An effective data logging solution was needed to address these vital concerns. Continue Reading…

Temperature and Sterilization Monitoring in a Rice Mill

CAS DataLoggers introduced a flexible data monitoring system to a rice miller and food processing company that had recently installed a new production line. This line produced various cooked rice products in reheatable and microwaveable polymer sachets. Consequently the data logging system was utilized to monitor the retort cooking and sterilization temperatures as well as the accumulated Fo value (expressing the heating time required for disinfection) during production of its various pouched rice products. The added capability to download the results was also necessary both for analysis and quality purposes. Internal calculation and real-time data collection were crucial customer needs. To learn more …